4 Most Common Myths Around Test Automation

  • Installing libraries using scripts
  • Setting configuration variables, etc.
  • Mocking Component Behavior
  • Useful in IoT & Embedded Software Testing
  • Can also reduce (or eliminate) actual hardware/component need
  • Test Reporting
  • Generating summary report/email.
  • Linking screenshots/logs to the reports.
  • Triggering emails on test execution, completion, etc.
  • Rerunning failures
  • It is helpful to automate the re-execution of failure/flaky tests.
  • It also helps to examine the consistency and probability of the failure.
  • Test Data Preparation
  • Creating synthetic test data
  • Creating dynamic & random test data
  • Scheduling Test Runs
  • Based on schedules
  • Based on continuous integration rules
  • Test Build Generation
  • Preparation of release candidates for testing
  • Updating results to ALM Tools
  • Ex: JIRA, Team Foundation Server, Polarion
  • Using API endpoints
  • Monitoring Production Logs
  • Comparing Files
  • Cleanup of Environment, etc.
  • By performing checks through tools, Test Automation will help you find information. Having such checks will enable you to find regression issues.
  • With Test Automation, you can define checks to detect:
  • Functional Issues
  • Performance Issues
  • Security Issues
  • Accessibility Issues
  • UI, Responsive Issues, etc.
  • Quality will, however, mean different things to different people. Below are some typical software user personas:
  • Marketing Team
  • Tech Writers
  • Testers
  • Programmers
  • Managers
  • Customer Service
  • Business Specialists
  • Support/Sales
  • Different notions of quality will apply to your context according to the persona of your customer. Here are some of the possible quality attributes:
  • Reliability
  • Speed
  • Usability
  • Scalability
  • Maintainability
  • Testability
  • Documentability
  • Trainability
  • Functionality
  • Supportability
  • While you may be able to control some of these attributes, the majority are beyond your control or scope as a test automation engineer.
  • Even though Test Scripts are one of the visible outcomes of test automation, there is more to it than that.
  • Automation engineers perform several activities that are often overlooked. They include:
  • Modelling application
  • Test data generation
  • Developing framework / reusable libraries
  • Work towards CI-CD-CT
  • CI = Continuous integration
  • CD = Continuous delivery/deployment
  • CT = Continuous testing
  • Documenting automation / Preparing readme documents.
  • Logging automation
  • Test design
  • Defining test execution strategy
  • Developing accelerator tools
  • Code review
  • Version controlling & tagging
  • Configuring / Parameterizing
  • With the rise of no-code test automation tools, the obvious equation of automation = programming has changed.
  • Today, You can automate test execution using coded tools as well as no-code tools.
  • Automating reduces human intervention, and there are various ways and tools to achieve it without or with coding.
  • If you are new to no-code tools, you can check out Testsigma which is a popular open-source no-code tool Testsigma. Here is the link to the open-source version of Testsigma: testsigmahq/testsigma: Build stable and reliable end-to-end tests @ DevOps speed. (github.com)
  • Even if you are a beginner in the field of automation, no-code tools can certainly be used as a starting pathway for learning automation.
  • Test Automation = No Manual Testing
  • Test Automation = Test Team Downsizing
  • Goal of Test Automation = 100% Automation

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Testsigma is a completely cloud-based codeless test automation tool that lets you create stable and reliable tests for web, mobile & APIs — all from one place.

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